Exmoor

The South West Coast Path www.southwestcoastpath.org.uk is but one of a range of resources you can tap into when looking at a few days away. If you’re walking a set route we can link up with other accommodation providers so that you’re heading in one direction…call us on 01643 863599….we can help to co-ordinate your Exmoor walking experience.

If you’re into photography the main challenge you’ll have to negotiate first will be what to photograph! Exmoor has so many interesting aspects in terms of flora, fawna, landscape and village life that days can be spent just taking it all in….

Exmoor National Park is an International Dark Sky Reserve. To achieve such distinction light spillage and light pollution has to be minimal and not interfere with night sky observation and Exmoors wide open moorland provide exactly that. Ask us about Exmoor starry night discovery evenings and we’ll point you in the right direction .

Cyclists are also well catered for…from a sedate pedal around Porlock (6m) to a 39m route from Ilfracombe to Minehead chances are you’ll find a route to suit your style and stamina. Our secure lock up is at your disposal.

  • Porlock Weir was once a small working harbour enclosed by lock gates. The shingle ridge, groynes and views across Porlock Bay to Hurlstone Point are much loved by artists and visitors alike.
  • Horner is a National Trust village with many thatched cottages, water mill, tea rooms, ancient woods and the trickling Horner Water which form part of a National Nature Reserve which is renowned for red deer, rare lichens and ancient oaks. A walk beside Horner Water on a sunny day is simply magical.
  • Allerford is another National Trust village within the Holnicote Estate and has a fifteenth century packhorse bridge over Aller Brook. The West Somerset Rural Life Museum is located in the old thatched school house.
  • Culbone sits deep in a shaded valley, famous for having the smallest parish church in England and for inspiring Coleridge’s ‘Kubla Khan’.
  • Doone Country is the area around Badgworthy Water where R.G. Blackmore’s novel ‘Lorna Doone’ was set. Attractions include Oare church which is mentioned in the novel.
  • Dunkery Beacon is the highest point on Exmoor at 1705 feet (519m) from where on a clear day up to 13 counties can be seen together with the Bristol Channel and Welsh mountains many miles away.
  • Dunster is a medieval village with its Yarn Market, Castle, Priory Church, Tithe Barn, various shops and places to eat.
  • Lynton and Lynmouth was once referred to as ‘Little Switzerland’ and is famous for its spectacular coastal scenery. Lynmouth is linked to Lynton by a water powered cliff railway.
  • Watersmeet is where the Hoar Water meets the East Lyn. It is a lovely beauty spot and Site of Special Scientific Interest and has a welcoming tea garden and visitor centre.
  • Valley of the Rocks offers spectacular sea cliffs rising to nearly 1000 feet (300m) and is also home to some very agile goats.
  • Selworthy is unsurpassed as a chocolate-box village, with its picture postcard green surrounded by thatched cottages, National Trust shop and splendid tearoom. Prominent for all to see is the newly refurbished Selworthy church which stands out as a land mark from miles away.
  • Wimbleball Lake was formed by damming the Haddeo and now acts as a reservoir. It is also the home of the South West Lakes Trust Water Sports Centre and offers various water sports activities.

Horse Riding
Exmoor has been known as a horse riding area for years and as it boasts more bridleways per square mile than any other National Park. The local stables will cater for all abilities, from a led walk for the children on a pony to a full on gallop across the open heather clad moors for the more experienced.

Other Activities:

Reservations